Planet Drum: A Celebration of Percussion and Rhythm

March 22, 2016

Mickey Hart's dazzling companion to his bestselling Drumming at the Edge of Magic is a captivating chronicle of our global fascination with drums and the primal rhythms and spells of percussion, dramatically illustrated with 350 photographs and illustrations.

Order the book here

Reviews:

"Mickey Hart goes into a global exploration of percusion instruments in this particular book. The interplay between sound and mysticism is explored, with lavish photographs and numerous quotations to boot. Although this book isn't much on words, theres a lot of good stuff in here. Breaking it down into various regions, Hart shows some wonderful examples of musical instruments used in Africa, Oceania, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Aside from more familar instruments (bullroarers, clap sticks and various drums), he also gives examples of exotic instruments like the shekere, mbira, shawm, skull drums and gamelan orchestras. In addition, he explores numerous non-western cultures, such as the Rashaida, Ethiopians, Tutsis, Nepalis and Ojibwa. Aside from this are little side-bars on various related subjects such as Shamanism, Capoeira, Carnival, drums and warfare and the "dance of the dead". Theres even a whole list of names various cultures around the world have for the bullroarer, which is considered sacred in cultures as far away as the Australian aborigines and the Apache of North America. And, of course, it explores the process of sound, from the big bang to the end of time itself, complete with a lot of cultural notes and tidbits that are great to know. For instance, did you know tht Ethiopian soldiers used to be accompanied by trumpters and drummers who symbolized the drummers who will herald the Apocalypse? Or that in some parts of the world drums really were used to communicate? Or that early Christians were summoned to church with a "sound board" instead of a bell? All of these small little notes, and many other historical facts and curiousities are contained within this book. And, finally, there are also a handful of illustrated myths and legends retold in the book. These include a Sioux legend of the origin of the powow drum and a Koori story about how the bull-roarer came to earth, as well as a grisly tale of what the Inca did to captured foes (made them into drums) and a Siberian tale of creation. This is really an amazing book. Those with an interest in anthropology, music or shamanism should take a brief look at this book. Heck, everyone should. It may not be a lot of reading, but it is wonderful to flip through and learn about the history of sound, mysticism and the pulse of the world itself. Just buy it and you'll see what I mean."

"Mickey hart writes a great book. he really does.I never dreamed there was so much depth to percussion.the companion book, drumming at the edge of magic has more words and fewer pictures than this one. which I prefer personally. buy both. they're worth it.really.both."

"A comprehensive book of drums throughout the world. I sent this copy to my grandson who is studying drumming, and he loved it.
I have several of Mickey Hart's books, and they're all great. Inspiring, and well-illustrated"

"Mickey Hart goes into a global exploration of percusion instruments in this particular book. The interplay between sound and mysticism is explored, with lavish photographs and numerous quotations to boot. Although this book isn't much on words, theres a lot of good stuff in here. Breaking it down into various regions, Hart shows some wonderful examples of musical instruments used in Africa, Oceania, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Aside from more familar instruments (bullroarers, clap sticks and various drums), he also gives examples of exotic instruments like the shekere, mbira, shawm, skull drums and gamelan orchestras. In addition, he explores numerous non-western cultures, such as the Rashaida, Ethiopians, Tutsis, Nepalis and Ojibwa. Aside from this are little side-bars on various related subjects such as Shamanism, Capoeira, Carnival, drums and warfare and the "dance of the dead". Theres even a whole list of names various cultures around the world have for the bullroarer, which is considered sacred in cultures as far away as the Australian aborigines and the Apache of North America. And, of course, it explores the process of sound, from the big bang to the end of time itself, complete with a lot of cultural notes and tidbits that are great to know. For instance, did you know tht Ethiopian soldiers used to be accompanied by trumpters and drummers who symbolized the drummers who will herald the Apocalypse? Or that in some parts of the world drums really were used to communicate? Or that early Christians were summoned to church with a "sound board" instead of a bell? All of these small little notes, and many other historical facts and curiousities are contained within this book. And, finally, there are also a handful of illustrated myths and legends retold in the book. These include a Sioux legend of the origin of the powow drum and a Koori story about how the bull-roarer came to earth, as well as a grisly tale of what the Inca did to captured foes (made them into drums) and a Siberian tale of creation.
This is really an amazing book. Those with an interest in anthropology, music or shamanism should take a brief look at this book. Heck, everyone should. It may not be a lot of reading, but it is wonderful to flip through and learn about the history of sound, mysticism and the pulse of the world itself. Just buy it and you'll see what I mean."